Bored in Church

Someone posted this on a bulletin board recently about his experience in a church service.

Justin’s Post – Bored in Church

So I was in church today, and about 20 minutes into the sermon, it clicked that I was bored out of my mind. I was trying to listen, I really was, but my mind kept wandering. It was like listening to a university lecture but without getting to ask questions and interact with the professor (actually, the pastor is a professor at a local Christian university, not where I go).

I also was thinking, “This whole sermon has revolved around “the Logos” in John 1:1-18. I know what Logos is, but if somebody wandered in, they would have NO idea. The pastor didn’t explain what Logos actually meant.

I wasn’t sure what to do about my bored-ness. Any suggestions… besides imagining what I’m going to make for lunch after church?

Chaille’s Response, RE: Bored in Church

[So I was in church today, and about 20 minutes into the sermon, it clicked that I was bored out of my mind.]Who ever said that the mind is where we truly experience God? See what 1 Corinthians 1:26-2:16 has to say about receiving spiritual truth and insight.

[ I was trying to listen, I really was, but my mind kept wandering.] The minder wanders. That’s what it does. It seems like you are trying to connect to God, who is a spirit, by using your mind to understand spiritual truths.

[It was like listening to a university lecture but without getting to ask questions and interact with the professor.] We get revelation from God not man. If the pastor is boring you, stop listening to him. Who said that you have to treat it like a lecture? By the way, why would you fellowship with a church where you aren’t being spiritually renewed and encouraged?

I zone in to the Spirit all the time in church gatherings/services while zoning out the pastor. Lots of time they are talking about stuff that is not where I am or is something from their own agenda. If I have to change course to connect with God where I am, I will. I may hear one sentence the teacher/pastor says and go off on a hunt for more treasure. I don’t care what the pastor is saying. I want to know what God wants to say to me. Now, I don’t do that all of the time, especially if what the pastor is saying really connects to where I am. But I believe that where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is liberty. This does not give me license to disrupt. Instead, it allows me to open my Bible and go somewhere else in the Word if what the pastor is saying seems like a foreign language.

[(actually, the pastor is a professor at a local Christian university, not where I go).] Jesus always had a hard time using the intellectuals. He preferred fishermen and the common people. They had less to unlearn.

[I wasn’t sure what to do about my bored-ness. Any suggestions… besides imagining what I’m going to make for lunch after church?] First of all, who ever said that being entertained should be a real high priority for a Christian? While I agree that we all want to be stimulated because that is how God wired us, it can be real dangerous when we start looking at a church gathering as a spectator event like a concert, speech or sports contest. Maybe you should just sit there and pray. Maybe you should write a love letter to Jesus. Maybe it’s not really about you and what you want. Yet again, maybe having your needs met is not a bad thing either. How is that for postmodern logic?

If you are not involved in a fellowship where there is real life, find another fellowship. You may be looking for treasure in a place where there is none. Get a new map and start digging at another spot.

May the Lord bless you as you seek greater revelation and more intimate fellowship!

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